2 September, 2015 - RollingStone.com
When Luke Bryan first won the ACM's Entertainer of the Year award in 2013, he wept tears of joy. "What I always wanted to be was just a country singer that got to ride on a tour bus and show up at a new stage and play music every night," he said, while accepting the award in a state of shock. The now "bona fide country music superstar" — as last night's ACM Honors host Jake Owen dubbed him — was in a more contemplative mood Tuesday evening when he accepted the Gene Weed Special Achievement Award at the ninth annual ceremonies in Nashville. ACM Awards 2015: Our Best Backstage & Onstage Photos The event honors the industry suits behind the scenes, songwriters behind the songs, the musicians behind the tracks and the artists themselves in a living-room-loose show where the stars pay tribute to their peers with once-in-a-lifetime performances. Like Jason Aldean and his shit-hot backing band rocking out a stomping medley of "Love in the First Degree," "Tennessee River" and "The Closer You Get" to salute Alabama, the recipients of the ACM Career Achievement Award. (Watch the performance above.) Introducing them as "the best band there's ever been," Aldean paid homage to his key influence. Alabama's founding members — Randy Owen, Jeff Cook and Teddy Gentry — were moved by the honor, to tears in Owen and Gentry's cases. Owen thanked the songwriters in the house, jokingly noting how many hits the band foolishly turned down over the years, before choking up while thanking his father. "He taught me how to play the guitar," the frontman recalled. He then thanked late Academy of Country Music executive director Bill Boyd and late ACM Awards producers Gene Weed and Dick Clark. "We would not be here, and we would not have [had] the career that we had had if it had not been for those three people." "They told me to keep it short but I'm not going to do that right now," said Bryan, accepting his award named after Weed, the longtime producer and director of the ACMs. The "Strip It Down" singer spent minutes praising the people who make up the backbone of Music Row, from bus drivers to songwriters. "When you win an award on TV," he said, "you don't get a chance to thank the truck drivers, bus drivers and everybody behind the scenes." Or the caterers, as a lone voice in the crowd shouted, eliciting a quip about those "damn chocolate chip cookies" from Bryan and random cheers from fans across the Ryman Auditorium. The legendary theater itself, colloquially known as the Mother Church of Country Music, was honored as the ACM's Venue of the Year — Small Capacity. "I never thought I'd get even let into the Ryman," Bryan said, noting that this very night marked the 14th anniversary of his moving to Nashville with a dream. To further honor Bryan, powerhouse vocalist Randy Houser turned in a spot-on rendition of the Crash My Party Number One "Roller Coaster." While two-time ACM Entertainer of the Year and three-time ACM Awards co-host Bryan might be the academy's golden boy of the day, in the Seventies the ACM crowned Loretta Lynn its Artist of the Decade. And last night the still touring 83-year-old coal miner's daughter received the ACM's top honor, the Crystal Milestone Award, while the crowd was treated to an all-smiles, spirited rendition of Lynn's relevant-as-ever 1972 Number One "Rated X" from Miranda Lambert. "She sang songs that were not necessarily appropriate to sing," Lambert said while presenting Lynn with the award, "so I'm so thankful for women empowerment." That sentiment rang true earlier in the evening when Kacey Musgraves took the stage sporting rhinestones. The only other performer on hand to deliver one of his or her own songs (Restless Heart sang "Bluest Eyes in Texas" for its author, former Arista Nashville honcho and ACM honoree Tim DuBois), Musgraves played her Pageant Material standout "Good Ol' Boys Club" for its co-writer and co-producer Luke Laird, who received the Songwriter of the Year honor. Keeping with the good ol' boys theme, Josh Turner later received a warm response after bellowing the 1980 Bob McDill-penned Don Williams classic weeper "Good Ole Boys Like Me" for McDill, who was honored with an ACM Poet's Award. It's probably worth noting that in 2015, 55 years into her career (and 50 years into the ACM's existence), Lynn was one of only three female honorees (of 20 total) at the event. The others were the Ryman's general manager Sally Williams, who received the Don Romeo Talent Buyer of the Year Award, and Felice Bryant. The latter was honored along with her husband Boudleaux Bryant, as half of one of the most influential songwriting duos in country music history, not to mention the first professional songwriters to set up shop in Nashville — Felice and Boudleaux Bryant, who also received a Poet's Award. In addition to penning the Tennessee state song "Rocky Top," the Bryants, both deceased (and who recently made Rolling Stone's list of the 100 Greatest Songwriters of All Time), wrote scores of iconic hits for Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison, Little Jimmy Dickens, Gram Parsons with Emmylou Harris and, most significantly, the Everly Brothers. Fittingly, perennially pompadoured and obvious Bryant disciple Chris Isaak paid tribute to the duo with a true-to-form take on the Everlys' "Bye, Bye, Love." The most emotional performance of the night, however, went to Roy Clark. The 82-year-old former Hee Haw host sang for ACM Awards TV producer Barry Adelman, recipient of the Mae Boren Axton Award. Sitting on a chair, and using a cane to walk on and off stage, Clark crooned a version of "Yesterday, When I Was Young" in a quavering rasp that sounded like a lifetime of memories being unpacked and boxed up again in a spellbinding four minutes. But it Holly Williams who was the show-stealer. Singing Eric Church's "Like Jesus Does," it was the most unlikely performance of the Honors. The crowd-silencing power of her yearning, effortlessly cutting vocals and some wailing pedal steel swells to match showed the daughter of Hank Jr. and the granddaughter of Hank Williams can take any song and make it her own, transforming Church's confessional into a grand anthem of heartbreak. Church took home the Jim Reeves International Award. He received the honor for his work as a de facto ambassador for country music, taking his 2014 tour oversees and playing seven countries in Europe (that's a big number for the apple-pie-American genre). While accepting the award, Church recalled the pre-show jitters he had before a gig in Cologne, Germany. "I think it was the most scared I've ever been. I looked out through the curtain and I saw people that didn't speak English, and I remember thinking, 'This could go one of two ways,'" Church said. "But I smelled marijuana and I thought, 'This is gonna be OK.'" Related Readers' Poll: The 10 Best Luke Bryan Songs Watch Eric Church Burn Through 'In America' at Volunteer Jam Luke Bryan Trumps Dr. Dre on Albums Chart
2 September, 2015 - MTV.com
There simply won't ever be any topping these hilarious celebrity-made Dubsmash videos. Ever.
2 September, 2015 - Billboard.com
Carrie Underwood's "Smoke Break" leaps 36-5 on Billboard's Hot Country Songs chart (dated Sept. 12). The first single from her fifth studio album,...
2 September, 2015 - MTV.com
We spoke to former MTV exec Van Toffler about his favorite moments from Sunday's VMAs and the iconic moments he'll cherish from 29 years of breathless awards show nights.
2 September, 2015 - MTV.com
Rihanna explains why she once banned a make-up artist from wearing a certain perfume around her.
2 September, 2015 - Billboard.com
Nicky Jam continues his hot streak in 2015 with six nominations for the new Latin American Music Awards -- more than any other artist. The Latin...
2 September, 2015 - MTV.com
Rihanna is on board with Kanye West's plan to run for president in 2020.
2 September, 2015 - MTV.com
"American Horror Story" co-creator Ryan Murphy shares another image of Finn Wittrock's character Tristan.
2 September, 2015 - MTV.com
What would the voices of ‘Frozen’ look like if it was a live-action movie instead of a cartoon?
2 September, 2015 - RollingStone.com
It is likely that right now, somewhere off the coast of the Virgin Islands, Kenny Chesney is bobbing on the ocean and reflecting on his remarkable year. Kenny Chesney at the Rose Bowl: See Behind-the-Scenes Photos "The last 15 years of my life, the very next day after the last show, I fly south and wake up and get on my boat, and I can hear the ringing in my ears from all summer," he tells Rolling Stone Country. The ringing may be especially loud this year. Chesney played more than 60 shows, kicking off with two nights at Nashville's Bridgestone Arena on his birthday and ending last weekend with his two customary blow-outs at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts. After taking a much-needed year off to recharge his batteries, the East Tennessee native admits that he had been anxious about how his latest album, The Big Revival would be received by fans and whether they would kick off their flip-flops to rejoin No Shoes Nation this summer. Clearly, he needn't have worried. Not only did Revival spawn three Number One hits for the superstar—"American Kids," "Til It's Gone," and "Wild Child," bringing his total to 27— the fans came out in droves, with Chesney smashing attendance records at some of the biggest venues in the country: MetLife Stadium, Lambeau Field, Heinz Field, Target Stadium, Lincoln Financial Field and more. In Foxborough alone, he played to over 120,000 people. "What I hoped would happen with my audience and this record and this tour and where I am in my life and my career. . . I felt like it couldn't have gone any better, as far as people connecting with it," says Chesney, sounding legitimately relieved. In many of those places, the country icon was joined by openers Old Dominion, Cole Swindell and Brantley Gilbert. Eric Church hopped on several dates, and Chesney teamed with Jason Aldean for 12 co-headlining stadium dates. He knew they wouldn't be easy acts to follow. "My mentality is to give the fans the best possible day we can give them," he says. "And to have Eric Church and Jason Aldean going before you? You sit on your bus and say, 'Well, you're going to have to step it up a little.' I think that's made me better, no doubt about it." (Of Church in particular, Chesney says, "Eric is so authentically great. I can sit and talk and do a whole article on Eric Church about how much I care about him as a person and what I think he means to music.") Watch Kenny Chesney Duet With Taylor Swift at Tour Opener "It would've been really easy to be at this spot in my career and go, 'I'm just going to do what's worked and not push myself,'" says Chesney of the sonically adventurous Revival and his mammoth tour. "But I'm really glad that we did and I'm even more thrilled that the anxiety that I had was validated — seeing all these people out here this summer — because if you don't care, they won't care. I really think about that with our audience. No matter what it is you're doing, especially with music and songs, if your audience feels for a moment that you don't care, why would you ask them to care?" And if there is one thing that everyone who knows Chesney knows — whether it is new friends or people he's had relationships with for decades — it is that he cares. "The guy's really thoughtful and he's really polite and he takes care of everybody," says singer-songwriter David Lee Murphy, who had the distinction of playing the first two shows in Nashville and the last two in Foxborough, joining Chesney both times for raucous renditions of his hits, "Dust on the Bottle" and "Party Crowd." (Murphy has also written a passel of hits for others including Chesney's "Pirate Flag" and "Living in Fast Forward" and Aldean's "Big Green Tractor.") "He wants everybody to feel special and all you've got to do is go to his show to see how hard he works," says Murphy, who jokes Chesney should don a Fitbit during his live shows to track his mileage. "He probably ran five miles last night!" That work ethic, routinely playing two and a half high-energy hours, is nothing new, says Murphy, who has known Chesney for more than 20 years and recalls playing a show with him to roughly 400 people at a "Rattlesnake Round-up" in Alabama in the Nineties. "He's pretty constant. When he gets up there, that's not an act that you see. That's a guy that just loves to make music and write songs and play them," he says, adding with a laugh, "Just now he plays Gillette Stadium two nights." Matthew Ramsey of Old Dominion had not known Chesney prior to his group hitting the road as the opener for the 'Big Revival' tour and was surprised by the friendliness of the headliner in their initial conversations. "He talked to me like he'd known me forever," says Ramsey. "The way he runs his operation from top to bottom, you never meet anybody in a bad mood, everyone is treated with such care." On the second to last night of the tour, Chesney invited Ramsey and Old Dominion bandmate Brad Tursi out for the live debut of his current hit, "Save It for a Rainy Day," which was written by the pair. Sure, he's the boss, but the praise for Chesney's equanimity is universal. Spend enough time around him and you'll see why; he's a person who is unfailingly gracious given the level of stardom he has attained. Whether it is the sponsors with whom he snaps pics backstage at Gillette or the fans to whom he offers a special moment at the meet and greet, Chesney wears his fame very lightly, if at all. It is not that his presence is unassuming, exactly, it is that he is eminently open. He can address crowds upwards of 60,000 — making Gillette Stadium feel like a back porch hootenanny as he leads a deafening singalong of "Boston"— and make you feel like you are the only person in the world that he wants to be talking to in a particular moment. Even when he has a major commercial shoot unexpectedly appear on his schedule during the final two shows — admittedly tired and with the finish line in sight, it is not ideal timing — Chesney rolls with the punches as cameras follow him through the bowels of the stadium chronicling his day-of-show routine. But ever the cut-up, he manages to give a sly wink to folks standing outside the shot. (The company for which Chesney is shooting the spot is on the DL, but, suffice to say, the man who has generally eschewed reality television, perfumes, and other tenuous brand extensions has chosen a major player for his rare advertising moment and will likely be inescapable on TV this fall.) And when the perpetually sleeveless singer-songwriter, who would appear to do nothing in half-measures, cares about something, he is all in. He speaks with Rolling Stone Country in the back seat of an SUV en route to Boston Medical Center for a luncheon with survivors of the Boston marathon bombings. Sporting a Red Sox cap and drinking a sugar-free Red Bull — "my only bad habit on tour," says the singer who abstains from alcohol save a customary mid-show gulp of a margarita — Chesney has come in a day ahead of the final two shows to break bread with some of the people who have benefitted from the Spread the Love fund the singer founded shortly after the attacks in 2013. The fund, whose moniker comes from a buoyant track featuring the Wailers on his 2012 album, Life on a Rock, has raised $400,000 through Chesney's own donation, those of others, and the revenue from T-shirts sold at his shows. He interacts with the people in the room, including doctors, hospital staff, and several survivors who lost one or both legs, as if they are family. And for him, they are. "I was so pissed when I saw the news," Chesney tells the group, recalling his reaction to the bombings. He goofs around with the service dogs that survivors Celeste and Sydney Corcoran have brought to the event and, in a quiet moment as the group mingles, he remarks in an aside, visibly moved, at how poignant it is that this group, brought together by tragedy, has forged a bond that goes beyond it. "This room was used as a family reunification center the night of the marathon bombings," explains Sheryl Katzanek, director of Boston Medical Center Patient Advocacy, following a group photo (dogs and all). "It was filled with such sorrow and pain, the emotion is indescribable. And to see this picture with joy in it is nothing short of a miracle." After declaring his ongoing concern, Chesney announces that he is donating another $100,000 to the fund, which aids those who lost limbs in procuring and upgrading prosthetics and other medical needs. (It's worth noting that when this meeting was set up, Chesney did not know a reporter would be attending and had to be cajoled to allow the monetary figure to be published.) "The end of the tour is a lot like the last day of school," he says, just prior to the luncheon. "There's this double-edged sword. You're tired and ready for a break but you don't want it to end because you wake up the next day and there's nowhere to go," he says with a laugh. But of course, for Chesney there is his traditional end of tour trip to the islands with his band and crew, numbering 110 people this year. "We're just celebrating the fact that, first of all, we have music in our lives and we get to share it with each other and all the faces we got to share it with. And the flip side of that coin is to blow off a whole lot of steam," he says, clearly relishing the idea of that relief valve. Eventually, after the last sunburned reveler departs, Chesney says he will get to a quieter place where he can once again start writing songs. "I haven't written a song in a while and I'm looking forward to getting to that place where I can shut my mind down enough to even begin that process," he says. "I wrote several songs for The Big Revival but since then we've either been preparing to tour, touring, or promoting that record and I haven't been in a creative place to be still enough to get into that spot. I'm looking forward to that." See Behind-the-Scenes Photos of Kenny Chesney's Tour Kickoff At the moment, Chesney reports that he has cut two songs but they are only on the "maybe" list for the next record, and he's not as concerned as he once was with having an album out before his next tour. "The business of doing business always has you thinking about it," he says. "But the one thing I loved about The Big Revival was that we didn't make that record in a cycle. I would love to have new music next year for the tour but I will tell you I'm not going to let next year's tour dictate new music." The entertainer envisions taking another break at some point and switching up the way he tours. "I've never gone overseas," he muses. "I think it would be fun to take a couple of acoustic guitars and go to Ireland and Australia and just play and film it. And then come back the next half of the year." Chesney is also attracted to the idea of a small venue tour where he can sing some of his more contemplative material, maybe hitting a theatre on the Wednesday night before his stadium show on a Saturday. "I think it would be fun for me and the fans that really love those songs and never get to hear them. That's something we may do. I can see myself really loving that. Feeding my soul and theirs, but still keeping the business model that we have out here." There is no room in that model for Chesney to start aping any current trends from the fading bro-country movement to the hip-hop or EDM bandwagons. "God, no," he says with a shudder before adding with a laugh, "I wouldn't know how." "It would be disingenuous and it would come across that way," he says. "I've been doing this for a while now and I think one of the reasons is because no matter what phases or trends are out there, I still believe that people want to be spoken to with really great songs that make people think or laugh or cry or give them the courage to get the hell out, whatever it is. I think that's what lasts forever over trends. I still believe people want to have fun and music is medicine to them, and they still want to hear songs that speak to them." Related Watch Kenny Chesney's Free-Spirited 'Wild Child' Video Kenny Chesney Teams With David Lee Murphy for New Album See Kenny Chesney's Picturesque 'Rainy Day' Video
2 September, 2015 - MTV.com
Lana Del Rey covers 'V' Magazine looking more Lana than ever.
2 September, 2015 - NME.com
Foals are currently on course to land their first ever UK Number One on the Official Albums Chart. The Official Charts Company reveals that the Oxford band's new LP 'What Went Down' is just ahead of The Weeknd's 'Beauty Behind The Madness'. The full chart will be announced on Friday (September 4). Last week's Number One, Jess Glynne's album 'I Cry When I Laugh', is at Number Three with Ella Eyre's 'Feline' and Motorhead's 'Bad Magic' are at Numbers Four and Five respectively. Press Foals' last album, 'Holy Fire', went to Number Two when it was released in 2013. Foals played surprise sets at both Reading And Leeds festivals over the weekend, with organiser Melvin Benn later tipping them as future headliners. Speaking to NME, Benn said that he is convinced that Foals will headline the festival one day, but confirmed that while one headline act is already booked for 2016 it is not the Oxford band. Benn praised the band and said, "I've made no secret of the fact that I want Foals as headliners." However, Foals rise to the top of the bill might not be as immediate as next year's festival. "Will it be next year – or the year after?" Benn added. "There's no decisions on that, no discussions on it. Foals are an amazing band and they will be a future headliner."
2 September, 2015 - MTV.com
'At first I thought bae was just an abbreviation for Beyoncé.'
2 September, 2015 - RollingStone.com
Phil Collins will kick off his "Take a Look at Me Now" reissue campaign on November 6th with remastered deluxe versions of his 1981 solo debut, Face Value, and his fifth LP, 1993's Both Sides. The track lists, personally curated and compiled by the singer-songwriter, feature original studio material contrasted with live and demo versions, intended to showcase the evolution of his songs over time.  Readers' Poll: The 10 Best Phil Collins Songs "I've always been quite proud of my demos and have often made them available as B-sides, but with a few exceptions, I have avoided including those on these collections," Collins says in a statement. "Instead, I've focused on how nicely the songs developed when played onstage, rather than showing how they originated." The reissue series will be spread over "the coming months," eventually spanning all of the former frontman-drummer's eight solo albums. Each set will be remastered by Nick Davis – who worked on the massive reissue campaign for Collins' former band, Genesis – and include new artwork featuring Collins recreating his poses from the original covers.  The albums will be released in several formats: 2-CD and digital versions will include the remastered album with additional content, and 180-gram heavyweight audiophile vinyl (single LP for Face Value, double LP for Both Sides) will include the stand-alone remastered album. CD and vinyl boxed sets compiling both deluxe editions will also be available.  The eclectic Face Value, which hit Number One in the U.K., spawned hits like the brooding "In the Air Tonight" and funky "I Missed Again," establishing Collins as a major commercial force apart from Genesis. Both Sides found the songwriter refining a soft-rock sound with singles like "Both Sides of the Story" and "Everyday." Face Value: Deluxe Edition Track List 1. "In The Air Tonight" 2. "This Must Be Love" 3. "Behind The Lines"4. "The Roof Is Leaking" 5. "Droned" 6. "Hand In Hand" 7. "I Missed Again" 8. "You Know What I Mean" 9. "Thunder And Lightning" 10. "I'm Not Moving" 11. "If Leaving Me Is Easy 12. "Tomorrow Never Knows"  Bonus Tracks 1. "Misunderstanding" - Live2. "If Leaving Me Is Easy" - Live3. "In The Air Tonight" - Live4. "Behind The Lines" - Live5. "The Roof Is Leaking" - Demo 6. "Hand In Hand" - Live7. "I Missed Again" - Live8. "....And So To F" - Live9. "This Must Be Love" - Demo10. "Please Don't Ask" - Demo11. "Misunderstanding" - Demo12. "Against All Odds" - Demo Both Sides: Deluxe Edition Track List 1. "Both Sides Of The Story"2.  "Can't Turn Back The Years"3. "Everyday"4. "I've Forgotten Everything"5. "We're Sons Of Our Fathers"6. "Can't Find My Way"7. "Survivors"8. "We Fly So Close"9. "There's A Place For Us" 10. "We Wait And We Wonder"11. "Please Come Out Tonight" Bonus Tracks 1. "Take Me With You"2. "Both Sides Of The Story" - Live3. "Can't Turn Back The Years" - Live4. "Survivors" - Live5. "Everyday" - Live6. "We Wait And We Wonder" - Live7. "Can't Find My Way" - Demo8. "I've Been Trying"9. "Both Sides Of The Story" 10. "Hero" - Demo   Related Phil Collins Sings With Miami Students $100 Million 'Phil Collins Alamo Collection' in the Works Phil Collins Cancels First Performance in Four Year
2 September, 2015 - Billboard.com
How do you celebrate the 10th anniversary of one of the most notable names in fashion? If you're taking a page from Alexander Wang's book, you invite...
2 September, 2015 - MTV.com
Tori Kelly and her brother photobombed these siblings at the VMAs.
2 September, 2015 - MTV.com
New research explains how a Brazilian wasp's venom destroys cancer cells but leaves healthy cells alone.
2 September, 2015 - MTV.com
Olicity's vacation photos from "Arrow" season 4 will make you smile.
2 September, 2015 - NME.com
A viral WhatsApp message in which Katy Perry appeared to call someone a "cunt" was a hoax, a fan has admitted. A video which surfaced earlier this week seemingly showed the singer grabbing a fan's phone during a gig and reading their messages. The video suggests that one of the messages she saw on the phone was from an unimpressed friend of the fan who claimed that Perry "can't sing live at all". The singer then appeared to take a selfie of herself of the phone and respond with a message of her own, writing: "You thought I would never see this chat, you dickless monkey. You have no balls, pussy. Cunt." A screenshot of the alleged exchange, which was also posted online, can be seen below. @Iwasdivine/Twitter Perry, however, denied that she had written the message. Posting on Twitter, she stated: "I NEVER wrote those words, that is an EDITED picture or the person added it after I took it. I would NEVER use the C word." Her denial prompted another Twitter user to accept they had doctored the footage. "I put this together back in December as a joke with NO intentions of any conflict," he said in a message to Perry. "Please realize I had no bad intentions." She responded by writing: "Thank you for your apology." Perry has recently been embroiled in an ongoing property dispute with a group of nuns. Perry thought that she would be able to buy the former convent from the archdiocese of Los Angeles, run by Archbishop Jose Gomez, for $14.5 million (£9.3 million). But the five nuns who live in the property say that Perry would be an unsuitable owner and want to sell it to businesswoman Dana Hollister instead.
2 September, 2015 - Billboard.com
Hollywood could be staying in Compton. In the wake of Straight Outta Compton's box-office success, APA is shopping Welcome to Death Row,...
2 September, 2015 - MTV.com
Alex Kingston will return to "Doctor Who" to play River Song.
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